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Incursions / The Way Things Go / Overview


THE WAY THINGS GO by Peter Fischli and David Weiss
Piazza del Duomo, Milan
March 8-9, 2008




THE WAY THINGS GO by Peter Fischli and David Weiss
Piazza del Duomo, Milan

Saturday, March 8, 2008 / 4:00 PM
Sunday, March 9, 2008 / 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM

On the occasion of the exhibition "Altri fiori e altre domande", Fischli and Weiss' first retrospective in Italy at Palazzo Litta, on Saturday March 8 at 4:00pm and Sunday March 9 at 4:00pm and at 6:00pm the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi presents the Peter Fischli and David Weiss' film The Way Things Go in the unique frame of Piazza del Duomo in Milan.

The film is projected on a gigantic screen in the historic piazza, dominating the square with its ballet mechanique. For two days only, the five-hundred-squared-meters (more than 5.000 square feet) screen that covers the scaffoldings of the Palazzo dell’Arengario is home to one of the most celebrated masterpieces of contemporary art.

The Way Things Go - Peter Fischli & David Weiss’ bizarre encyclopaedia of accidents - is presented for the first time in an extraordinary public screening, enlarged to epic proportions.

Peter Fischli and David Weiss have been working together since 1979 during which time they have established themselves as the prophets of an art of childish amazement, ferocious scepticism, and primal stupor. The Swiss duo casts an enchanted look upon the world, revealing its banal beauty and its astonishing dullness.

The forty-minute film The Way Things Go (1987) is one of Peter Fischli and David Weiss’ most fundamental works. In the film, everyday objects become alive and chase each other in an exhilarating sequence of chain reactions, a domino effect in which chaos and order endlessly wrestle for supremacy.

For this presentation in Milan, The Way Things Go escapes the confines of museums and exhibition spaces to directly challenge the audiences in the streets of the city of Milan. Shown in Piazza del Duomo, the film becomes a gigantic visual poem, a larger than life Odyssey in which banal objects and surreal machines give life to spectacular catastrophes and Do-It-Yourself revelations.